Archives

20.4.17

How to find your writer’s voice

The swashbuckling red-headed author, Jason Fox, springs to mind when thinking about writers who have a distinctive voice. He writes like a modern-day gentleman pirate-on-a-mission, captaining a fine ship on a mysterious quest, laughing heartily as the faint-hearted jump overboard.

Lois P Frankel, author of Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office, is another shining example of a Clarion writer’s voice. Hers is a no-nonsense, hard-hitting tone that is ever so slightly scathing. She pulls apart the myths that hold women back from triumphing in the workforce with all the delight of a kid de-winging a fly. I nearly replaced that horrible image, but I had to leave it there. It seems to fit.  Read More

 
12.4.17

Who am I to write a book?

That question is a show stopper. That doubt keeps us from putting words on paper and publishing them. But I love the question, too; anyone who worries about it brings integrity and humility to their book that, I guarantee, will make it a beautiful, ‘sticky’ book.

To step up to the task of writing and sharing our wisdom with the world, we must find an answer to this question.  Read More

 
5.4.17

How not to waste your writing time

Have you ever set aside a whole day, or scheduled a full morning to write, only to find that somehow, the whole time gets wasted? Ouch.

You arrive at the allocated time, but you are sick. You sit down to write a chapter, but instead, you completely restructure your book outline, only to realise that the original one was better. You decide that mornings are your best writing time, but somehow you always have something else to do in the morning. Or you sit staring at your laptop, or page, and sink deep into the ‘I’m not good enough’ mindset.  Read More

 
29.3.17

Why authors are inhuman

Melbourne drivers have a habit of travelling in two lanes at once. It’s infuriating of course. I know where I am going, and that I need to be in the left lane to get there. So when I get behind a driver who sits across both left and right lines, they appear to be a monster, an idiot, and a deeply selfish, self-centred unreasonable person.

Or are they simply demonstrating the highest level of human intelligence, one that gives us a deep insight into why writing a book makes us so uncomfortable. In a fascinating TED talk, entrepreneur and scientist Alex Wissner-Gross, provides us with a new equation for intelligence. ‘Intelligence should be viewed as a physical process that tries to maximise future freedom of action and avoid constraints in its own future.’  Read More

 
22.3.17

Grateful for the bad stuff

Gratitude has changed me. I used to feel so sorry for myself (Years ago, I mean. I am so much wiser now!). Everyone else was to blame for my problems. I didn’t say so, of course. I tried to stay positive. ‘Yes, I got retrenched,’ I’d say. ‘But as one door closes, another one opens…’ I felt I was being false. Still, it’s a good thing I didn’t have the guts to say what I thought; it wasn’t pretty.  Read More

 
15.3.17

Impassioned or biased: Which one are you?

As a thought leader, you have strong views. You have based these ideas on years of experience, research and thinking. You know that they make a difference to people because you have seen people change when you train or mentor them, or speak to them from the stage.

These ideas are the fuel that drives you, that sees you leap out of bed in the morning (at least as far as the coffee machine), that gives you the vigour to write your book. It’s your crusade, your reason for doing what you do.  Read More

 
8.3.17

How to decide what to write about

Paralysed by possibilities? The thought leaders I work with – trainers, speakers, coaches – spend a lot of time generating intellectual property. My clients tend to struggle with choosing from too many ideas, not too few. And, since most of us (I include myself here) stew on the idea of writing a book for ages before we sit down to write one, many ideas are jostling in a queue for attention.  Read More

 
1.3.17

Why hiring a ghostwriter is a mistake

Professional writers are wonderful people (if I do say so myself). I am one, after all. Because we write every day, we have a way with words, are experts at finding information, and are efficient at getting the job done. One service professional writers offer is ghostwriting; this means that we write your book but you appear on the cover as the author. Sometimes ghostwriters are credited on the cover underneath the author’s name – By Jane Doe with Kath Walters – for example.  Read More

 
23.2.17

How US President Donald Trump makes writing my blog more fun

I sat down at a café table a month ago and watched my daughter’s eyes brim with tears at the implications of the US President Donald Trump coming to power. The hate, the division and the stupidity floored her. I feel the same.

At that moment, I decided to make sure every blog I wrote this year included a reference to the stupidity of President Trump. My blog is not a political one – it’s about the positioning power of writing business books and blogs – but weaving a reference to President Idiot into all my blogs makes my task more fun.

We are drawn to do what is fun. What is fun, is easier to do. For thought leaders, writing a regular blog is a vital step in building your authority and position, so finding ways to make the job easier and more fun equals a smart move.  Read More

 
17.2.17

Lessons from a chocolate-brown poodle about active voice

About 10 days ago, a chocolate brown poodle ran in front of my push bike, and I couldn’t stop in time. I fell off and ended up in a hospital with a broken wrist and received what the doctors like to call lacerations (horrid gashes) to my knee and my forearm. Ouch.

I am not writing this to bring a tear to your eye. Well, that’s not true. I do want you to feel my pain (a little). I prefer you to worry more about me than about the chocolate brown poodle for example. (He is alright by the way.) And so I wrote this first couple of paragraphs in the active voice.

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